U of G Professor Discusses Dinosaur Nasal Passages

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Portrait of Matthew Vickaryous with a gecko

OVC Prof. Matthew Vickaryous

Matthew Vickaryous, a professor with U of G’s Ontario Veterinary College, spoke to The Atlantic for a feature story about the convoluted nasal passages of a dinosaur with a peculiar nose.

A research team has studied the ankylosaur, a dinosaur that lived around 75 million years ago in present-day Alberta. Its complex nasal apparatus may have made it difficult to breathe.

In the article, Vickaryous said today’s technology makes it easier to understand the complex structures inside “dino-snouts.” CT (computerized tomography) data about ankylosaurs is now much more widely available, he said.

Paleontologists discovered more than a century ago that the great reptile’s nasal passages consisted of a complicated series of chambers and tubes.

A professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences, Vickaryous studies wound healing, neurogenesis and spinal cord regeneration, including the regenerative capacities of geckos.