Faculty, Student Make Headlines

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In an op-ed column in the Globe and Mail on Dec. 29, Prof. Sylvain Charlebois, Marketing and Consumer Studies, and Prof. Ralph Martin, Plant Agriculture, discussed the benefits of pulses, including vegetables such as dried peas, beans, lentils and chickpeas. Canada is a leader in growing pulses. Their column said pulses have strong nutritional attributes but more research is needed to help farmers cultivate them. Martin studies sustainable food production, and Charlebois studies food distribution and global food systems.

Charlebois was interviewed for a Canadian Press story on Dec. 29 that appeared in outlets such as CTV News, and by Global News on Dec. 24. He discussed high food prices and consumer choices. He is a co-author of the annual Food Price Index, which was also referenced in CBC News and Global News – B.C. stories in December.

Prof. Kate Shoveller, Animal Biosciences, was interviewed by CHCH on Morning Live on Dec. 22 on pet nutrition and health. She said fish is a top ingredient in pet foods. She said it’s important to keep pets active during the holiday. Shoveller previously worked at a pet food manufacturer, and now studies companion animal nutrition.

History doctoral student Mark Sholdice was interviewed by the Toronto Star Dec. 22 for a story on parallels between repealing the prohibition of alcohol and legalizing marijuana sales. Sholdice said governments historically have raised revenue not just by regulating the sale of a previously banned product but also by actively promoting that product. He studies Canadian and American history.

Prof. Steven Rothstein, Molecular and Cellular Biology, was interviewed by the Ottawa Sun Dec. 21 on the viability of using transgenic tobacco plants to help grow sex hormones. He studies plant genetics and biochemistry.

A Toronto Star story on potentially polluted wells in the Oak Ridges Moraine on Dec. 20 featured an interview with adjunct professor John Cherry, who called for improved government oversight. Cherry is associate director of U of G’s G360 Centre for Applied Groundwater Research, which reviewed an environmental report from Hydro One. He studies groundwater contamination and hydrogeology.