OVC Cancer Research, Grads, Profs In the News

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OVC professors and cancer researchers Paul Woods and Byram Bridle are featured in the Oct. 19 Globe and Mail. The article, which appears on the cover of the Life & Arts section, focuses on work Woods and Bridle are doing in the Mona Campbell Centre for Animal Cancer, and how companion animals can help find cures for human cancer. The story also quotes Kim Robinson, the managing director of OVC Pet Trust. Woods, a clinical studies professor and head of the Ontario Veterinary College’s oncology service, is co-director of OVC’s Institute for Comparative Cancer Investigations and has been involved in the cancer treatment of small animals for many years. Bridle, a viral immunologist in the Department of Pathobiology, recently received a grant from the Terry Fox Research Institute for an innovative study on dogs with osteosarcoma.

Two U of Guelph graduates, Gavin Armstrong and Christopher Charles, had their research featured in Forbes on Oct. 18. The article looks at how Armstrong and Charles designed the Lucky Iron Fish, a product designed to reduce anemia in the people of Cambodia. Charles and Armstrong discuss the challenges they faced in creating the business, which today sells more than 10,000 fish a month, helping families reduce iron deficiencies.

Prof. Evie Adomait, Economics and Finance, is also in the Oct. 19 Globe and Mail. She has been part of an ongoing series featuring experts discussing the upcoming federal election. In Monday’s story, she and two other economists grade the political leaders on their election promises. Adomait is the author of Cocktail Party Economics: The Big Ideas and Scintillating Small Talk about Markets.

Political science professor Tamara Small is featured in an Oct. 18 online CBC news story about social media and the federal election. Small researches the role of the Internet and new information technology in Canadian politics. She says social media is an ineffective tool for communicating with voters, and advises politicians to consider the goals they want to achieve on social media and develop a strategy.

Prof. Jamie Gruman, Department of Management, was featured in the National Post Oct. 16. Gruman discussed the concept of positive psychology and the role it plays in dealing with life’s challenges. Gruman, who is the chair of the Canadian Positive Psychology Association, studies employee engagement and positive organizational behaviour.

Prof. Tony Winson, Sociology and Anthropology, was interviewed by Radio-Canada International (RCI) on Oct. 15. He discussed the issue of supply management in Canada’s agricultural sectors, specifically in regards to dairy and poultry producers. He studies Canadian agribusiness and has written several books on agriculture relating to politics, business and social issues.

Prof. Sylvain Charlebois, Marketing and Consumer Studies, wrote a Globe and Mail op-ed column on Oct. 14 and was interviewed by RCI on Oct. 13. Charlebois discussed the impact the Trans Pacific Partnership trade deal and increased competition would have on Canadian dairy producers. Charlebois studies food distribution, security and safety, and is currently writing a book on global food systems.

Prof. Charlotte Yates, provost and vice-president academic, was interviewed by the Financial Post on Oct. 13. In the article, Yates discussed self-driving cars and the potential for the industry to innovate and change. She noted this could be beneficial for small technology companies. Yates is the lead researcher at the Canadian Automotive Policy Partnership and studies manufacturing and industrial policy.

Prof. Ralph Martin, Plant Agriculture, was interviewed by the Montreal Gazette on Oct. 13 for a report on a sustainable diet conference taking place in Montreal. Martin discussed the impact food waste has on many Canadian families, with the average family wasting 20 per cent of what they spend on food. He said steps must be taken to reduce the amount of wastage of produce. Martin studies food waste and sustainable food production.

Prof. Evan Fraser, Geography, was interviewed by CBC Radio’s The 180 on Oct. 11. Fraser discussed the issue of food security and potential issues in terms of eating from increasingly global sources. Fraser noted that true food security starts close to home. He was also interviewed by CBC Radio – Kitchener/Waterloo’s The Morning Edition on Oct. 9, discussing rising food prices. Fraser holds the Canada Research Chair in Global Food Security and created “Feeding Nine Billion,” a project intended to spark discussion about feeding the Earth’s ballooning human population.

Prof. Jennifer McWhirter, Population Medicine, was interviewed by Yahoo! Canada on Oct. 9 and by Radio-Canada International on Oct. 1. In the stories, McWhirter discussed tanning and skin cancer, and their depictions in Canadian magazines. McWhirter conducted a study that examined these magazines, and looked at the messages they conveyed to readers; most did not promote ways, besides suntan lotion, of preventing skin cancer. She studies the promotion of health and prevention of disease through effective communication, education, and policy.

Prof. Mike Dixon, Environmental Sciences, was the subject of a video report by the Vancouver Sun on Oct. 9 as part of the Conversations that Matter series. The extended interview looks at Dixon’s research in growing vegetables in space, along with food security and sustainable agriculture in urban environments. Dixon and his team are growing plants at various pressures in hypobaric chambers in U of G’s Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility. He has been studying how to sustain life in space for nearly 30 years.

Prof. Ian Duncan, Animal Biosciences, was interviewed by the Toronto Star on Oct. 9. In the story, Duncan discussed why the writer’s pet turkey appeared friendly towards people. Duncan spoke about how turkeys interact with people and why turkeys are different from chickens. He studies animal welfare, specifically looking at poultry.

Prof. Kate Parizeau, Geography, was interviewed by CBC Radio – Kitchener/Waterloo’s The Morning Edition on Oct. 8. She was discussing the issue of food waste, and what steps can be taken to reduce it. Parizeau studies informal recycling, food waste, and waste management policy.

Prof. Tina Widowski, Animal Biosciences, was interviewed by the Toronto Star on Oct. 7 for a story on McDonald’s move to purchase eggs from free-run barns. Widowski discussed how the move could change the industry and animal welfare practices on farms. She studies how animals perceive and respond to the environments they are kept in and ways to improve their welfare.

Prof. Sylvain Charlebois, Marketing and Consumer Studies, wrote on the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade deal in a Globe and Mail op-ed on Oct. 6 and was interviewed about TPP in an Oct. 6 CBC News story, and in a CTV News story and in the Financial Post on Oct. 5. He was also interviewed in the Globe and Mail on Oct. 5 about McDonald’s new advertising campaign that highlights the role of Canadian farmers in its food products. He was interviewed by the Business News Network Oct. 2 on TPP and did a CBC radio interview on increasing grocery prices. Charlebois is a lead author of the food price index published annually by U of G’s Food Institute, and he studies food distribution and policy.

A story in the Toronto Star on Oct. 5 features Prof. Mike Dixon, Environmental Sciences. The story focuses on Dixon’s research on growing plants in outer space. Dixon and his team are growing plants at various pressures in hypobaric chambers in U of G’s Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility. Dixon has been studying how to sustain life in space for nearly 30 years.

Prof. Kate Parizeau, Geography, appears in the latest issue of the The Walrus magazine. She is quoted in a story on household food waste. Parizeau studies waste management and its social context, most recently middle-class Canadian household habits. She says that consumer food waste tends to reflect socio-economic status.

Keith Solomon, professor emeritus in Environmental Sciences, is quoted in an Oct. 4 Washington Post story. The article looks at glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup; Solomon discusses exposure levels and human risk. Solomon studies the effects of pesticides and industrial chemicals and risk assessment.

Prof. Evie Adomait, Economics and Finance, was featured in the Globe and Mail Oct. 3. She and two other economics professors discuss the federal election and the leaders’ performance on the Trans-Pacific Partnership and trade. It’s part of an ongoing series during the election campaign. Adomait is the author of Cocktail Party Economics: The Big Ideas and Scintillating Small Talk about Markets.